Posted in Daisy Reads, Updates

May’s Review Material Reveal

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I am so happy to announce that for this month’s review I will be reading Madeline Miller’s fantastic book ‘Circe’!

‘Circe’ takes one of the most forgotten and elusive nymphs in Grecian mythology to the forefront in this “truly spellbinding” narrative. Exploring her presence in epic mythological tales from ‘The Odyssey’ to Theseus and the Minotaur; Madeline Miller creates a never-before explored feminist twist to a woman normally absent from the classical narrative.

I’ve been wanting to get my hand on a copy of this novel forever! I can’t wait to do a review on this amazing book!

Are you excited for this month’s chosen review material? If not; please make sure to leave a suggestion in my ‘Contact’ page and make sure to stay up-to-date by subscribing to my mailing list, following my blog and keep track of my social media over on Instagram!

I’ll be releasing my review on this novel sometime around mid-May so make sure to stay connected!

Until then!

Daisy

ThatBookBlogger

Instagram: @thatbookblogger

WordPress: @daisythebookblogger

Posted in Daisy Reads, Updates

April’s Review: Gail Honeyman’s ‘Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine’

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Happy Easter to all those that celebrate! We hope your day was full of reading, sunshine and rest!

For April’s review theme, it was ‘Editor’s Picks’, a chance for me to pick and review a novel that has been on my to-read list. And for this month, I decided to review Gail Honeyman’s 2017 debut novel ‘Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine’ after hearing about its immense popularity and readership.

Since its publication in 2017, Honeyman’s ‘Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine’ has received rave critical and audience reviews and has been discussed and reviewed by a huge range of book and lifestyle bloggers alike. Just the other day in my local library I overheard a woman requesting a copy of the novel to be delivered only for the librarian to respond that she would be added onto a list of FOURTEEN requests before it’d be her turn to take out a copy! But is the novel worth waiting for?

Honeyman’s novel is touching and disturbing all at the same time. The what-may-seem-to-be heartwarming story line can not only be read as a simple adult fiction story but as a possible social commentary on British foster and social care systems as well as an evaluation on our attitudes towards the ‘outsiders’ of the world. The novel can also be included as part of the huge rising literary movement that has begun to respond to attitudes towards mental health issues and attitudes. ‘Eleanor Oliphant’ is thus not only a text to be enjoyed and discussed, but a text to analyse and think about.

Honeyman’s writing style captures Eleanor’s aloof perspective perfectly. Her use of language, comedy and action creates a captivating portrayal of a woman struggling to be noticed in a society whose habits and expectations are alien to her.

It would be wrong to think that this story is lighthearted, but the darker subject matters of the novel such as suicide, abuse, stalker-mentality and mental illness are written respectfully and tactfully. Honeyman should be praised for touching on such subjects so diligently.

I also enjoyed how the novel was devised. Yes, the ending was somewhat predictable (in the way that all adult general fiction novels are), however I found it enthralling to read a novel which does not feature romance or infatuation so heavily within its story line, particularly in a novel that focuses on a female protagonist.

And Eleanor Oliphant’s character is perfectly created. She is the anti-Mary Poppins, practically imperfect in every way. She disgusts, she humours, she elicits sympathy but most of all she surprises. Her character development is finely done; Honeyman ensures the reader of Eleanor’s personal abnormalities so often that we are left looking for them within our own person.  

If you can get your hands on a copy, ‘Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine’ is a novel that delights, repulses and lingers in the mine even weeks past the final page.

Make sure you stay in touch over on @thatbookblogger(s) Instagram to stay up to date with all our reviews and posts on ‘ThatBookBlog’. Let me know your thoughts and recommendations over on our ‘Contact’ page. May’s review material will soon be released!

Until then,

Happy reading!

Daisy

ThatBookBlog.com

WordPress: @daisythebookblogger

Instagram: @thatbookblogger

Posted in Daisy Reads, Updates

April’s Review Theme

April Editor Picks

Can you believe it’s nearly April?!

With Spring and the end of my university’s Winter term looming, I thought it time to treat myself to the many ‘to-read’ books stacked up upon my Goodreads shelf!

That’s why next month’s review theme is going to be ‘Editor Picks’, a month when I review a book chosen specifically because I’ve been putting off reading it for so long!

I’ll be posting what next month’s review material will be both here as well as on my Instagram @thatbookblogger on April 1st so make sure you follow the site to stay updated!

If you would like to make a suggestion on what you want to see me review in the future, make sure to leave a comment on my ‘Contact’ page or over on my account at Instagram!

In the meantime,

Happy reading!

Daisy

ThatBookBlog.com

WordPress: @daisythebookblogger

Instagram: @thatbookblogger

Posted in Daisy Reads

March’s Monthly Theme

Magical Realism WordPress

I’m so happy and excited to announce that March’s Monthly Theme will be ‘Magical Realism’!

Magical Realism is one of my favourite genres and is the creative charge of fantastic novels such as ‘The Night Circus’ by Erin Morgernstern, Carrie Hope Fletcher’s ‘All That She Can See’ and so many more!

If you haven’t yet read January’s ‘Famous Figures’ review of James Shapiro’s fantastic book ‘Contested Will’, you can do so over on the page ‘Daisy Reads’. If you’re fascinated by the conspiracies surrounding the life and works of William Shakespeare, Shapiro’s 2010 text is one to add to your list!

The vote for March’s reviewing material will be released on @ThatBookBlog(‘s) Instagram on the 28th February and will give you the opportunity to vote for what two chosen novels you would like me to read and review.

If you’d like to make any reading suggestions or recommendations yourself, be sure make a comment over on my ‘Contact’ page.

If you’d like to stay in touch or keep-up-to-date over on ‘ThatBookBlog’, be sure to follow the blog or subscribe to our emailing list to receive regular updates for new posts and comments.

Until March,

Happy reading!

Daisy

ThatBookBlog

WordPress: @daisythebookblogger

Instagram: @thatbookblog

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Daisy Reads, Updates

February’s ‘Famous Figures’: A review of James Shapiro’s ‘Contested Will’

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Who was the bard?

This isn’t a question that James Shapiro tries to answer, but one he strives to make some academic sense of. Why are we so obsessed with the bard and who he is? And why do we continue to search for evidence of his life and existence over 400 years later?50428382_371966263603331_4747624129937539072_n

Shapiro’s ‘Contested Will’ is one of those rare academic gems; a well-researched text made approachable and accessible for even the least experienced and knowledgeable Shakespeare scholar. Shapiro is in ingenious in his exploration of the conspiracies surrounding Shakespeare and his plays, not simply just describing what these theories are, but how they came to be so present even now in the 21st century.

However it is important to note, that like any other academic text, facts can always be made false as more research is conducted over time. The fact that ‘Contested Will’ was published over 9 years ago means that this is more likely to be the case with Shapiro’s text, but this does not mean that the text’s worth is any less because of it. Even when searching ‘Contested Will’ on any search engine, no evidence of any kind of factual inaccuracy arises surrounding the text; but it’s always important to read and perceive these kinds of texts with some kind of awareness of its possible inaccuracy.

The text is well written and well approachable to the scholarly eye, but those who are looking for a more informal, thrilling read around Shakespeare’s life and conspiracies should turn away from Shapiro’s text and seek some of the more extreme (and invalidated) work of Shakespearean scholars such as Edmond Malone (an 18th century scholar who was proven to be discredited and who is hugely berated by Shapiro).

But this is what I feel is Shapiro’s most praiseworthy, defining factor. His exploration is rational, formal and is well balanced in its bias in that it feels that is has none (with the possible exception in his account of said previous Edmund Malone) despite Shapiro’s admittance that he is in no doubt that Shakespeare is Shakespeare, and not any other examples offered up by incredulous scholars such as Sir Francis Bacon, Walter Raleigh or Christopher Marlowe. Shapiro is a praiseworthy scholar in that he doesn’t allow his beliefs to affect his judgement in any way whatsoever.

So is ‘Contested Will’ worth reading?

Personally, yes.

That said, even as an English student, I found it was sometimes difficult to get used to the idea that I was reading a scholarly, formal text in my own free time for enjoyment; and this particular subject and text might be a stretch for those who are not used to the form and structure of such scholarly essays. But Shapiro’s text is well-worth a read when you are in good need of rest from some of the contemporary drivel supplied on social media sites today, or even just for some good old fashion knowledgeable fun. 

Message from ThatBookBlog:

Hi there! I hope you enjoyed this month’s review material and that you’ve been keeping up with more of ‘ThatBookBlog’ news over on Instagram at our handle @thatbookblogger.

If you’d like to make any suggestions towards what you think we should review, or even what you think our review theme should be for the month of March; please feel free to leave a comment on our ‘Contact’ page and be sure to follow our blog and subscribe to our mailing list for more of ‘ThatBookBlog’ updates!

Happy reading!

Daisy.

ThatBookBlog.com

WordPress: @daisythebookblogger

Instagram: @thatbookblog

 

 


 

Posted in Daisy Reads, Home

You chose… ‘Contested Will’ for February’s ‘Famous Figures’!

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It’s fair to say that the fiction and poetry of many of the finest writers of the past century or so…have been deeply autobiographical. The link between the life and the work is one of the things we’re curious about and look for when we pick up the latest book by a favourite author.” – James Shapiro ‘Contested Will’

I’m happy to reveal that February’s ‘Famous Figures’ most voted material is James Shapiro’s 2010 ‘Contested Will’!

You voted over on Instagram that Shapiro’s explorative text should be reviewed over Lucy Worsley’s ‘Jane Austen At Home’.

Shaprio’s novel explores the many conspiracy theories and rumours surrounding of one of the most famous, and elusive, playwrights and poets of the 17th century. Not only does he explore never-before seen details surrounding ‘the bard’s’ life and career, but asks why so many other authors have been suggested to write the plays that are still so popular today.

My review will be uploaded sometime around mid-February so make sure you follow and keep posted in order to receive regular updates and information.

Are you disappointed with the choice? Submit your own suggestions for review in my ‘Contact’ page and let me know why I should take on your suggestion!

Happy reading,

Daisy

ThatBookBlog.com

WordPress: @daisythebookblogger

Instagram: @thatbookblog

 

 

 

Posted in Daisy Reads

February’s ‘Famous Figures’ Review Material Reveal

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Revealing February’s ‘Famous Figures’ review material!! To kick off the wet month of February, I will be reviewing Lucy Worsley’s ‘Jane Austen at Home’ and James Shapiro’s ‘Contested Will’, two historical and biographical accounts of two of England’s (and indeed, the world’s) most influential authors!

Worsley’s biographical account of Jane Austen’s life was published at the bi-centenary of Austen’s death, providing intricate details never before seen into Austen’s childhood and early death at 41 in 1817. The book itself was a Sunday Times Bestseller and has received monumental praise in response of it’s publication.

Likewise, Shapiro’s 2010 piece ‘Contested Will’ received much brow raising as he attempts to delve into the elusive life of Shakespeare, exploring and evaluating the evidence and possible truths of ‘the bard’s’ many conspiracies surrounding his life and work.

Voting will soon open over @thatbookblogger on Instagram where YOU can decide which one of these fabulous texts will be read, evaluated and reviewed.

Are you excited about our choices? If not, make sure you send us a recommendation!

Happy reading,

Daisy

ThatBookBlog

WordPress: @daisythebookblogger

Instagram: @thatbookblogger

 

Posted in article, Home

Morning Glory?

“Morning without you is a dwindled dawn” – Emily Dickinson

early-morning

Finding time to read a little everyday in our busy months is like a little luxury. So why don’t why we take this time and treat it as such? When we try to squeeze in time to read it becomes a daunting process; an assigned and expected prescription forced in to our daily routine to better ourselves. But this creates a sudden self-tension and all of a sudden reading has become that which we hate the most; a daily chore that blends in or is faded into the background as a less important task for today.

But why is this? Reading can be pure joy, the mental equivalent of a spa-break for your head. So why do we continue to treat this important and necessary activity as of little importance than our daily workouts or even our beauty routines?

Some may argue that there isn’t simply enough time in the day, but this is merely an excuse. Instead of that glass of wine in front of the telly after a day of work, turn to one of your oldest, battered and forgotten novels and treat that as a time to unwind instead.

So here is a challenge for you ‘putter-offer’ readers; take half an hour everyday to just read. It could be a paper on the commute on the tube; a news article on your phone in your lunch break at the office; or even a quick short story in a magazine between school-runs, washing clothes and shopping trips because the benefits of reading (particularly in the morning) are endless.

Not only will reading more frequently keep your brain sharp, but frequent reading can be treated as equally beneficial brain exercises as puzzles, lowering mental decline that comes with age by 32% (Neurology). Frequent readers are also 2.5 times less likely to develop Alzheimers than those who engage more frequently in less stimulating activities, keeping your mind young and well-functioning as you begin to hit retirement (PNAS).

Reading in the morning is like a workout for your brain as much as exercise is for your body; it will wake you up, relieve your stress and stimulate early mental activity. Do whatever works for you; get up at 4am just to read for an extra half an hour before your daily ‘get ready’ routine, relax in your garden with a mug of tea and the chapter of a big book before you even begin to think of tidying your house. It will be difficult at first, but much like the other elements of your day, it will soon become an absorbed and truly healthy habit that can benefit your mental well-being throughout your life.

So, happy reading,

Daisy

ThatBookBlog

WordPress: @daisythebookblogger

Instagram: @thatbookblogger   

Image Source: https://thenextdoor.org/blog-post-early-mornings/early-morning/

In-Text Citation:

Neurology. “Life-span cognitive activity, neuropathologic burden, and cognitive aging.”

http://n.neurology.org/content/81/4/314

PNAS. “Patients with Alzheimer’s disease have reduced activities in midlife compared with healthy control-group members.” https://www.pnas.org/content/98/6/3440.full

 

Posted in Daisy Reads

February’s Theme

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I can now happily reveal that February’s review theme will be ‘Famous Figures’! Hurray!

For what would English literature be now without the influence of all these famous writers? With a new year comes a new time for knowledge!

Don’t worry though, I may not be specifically reviewing the work that these people have written…although it will certainly be surrounding some of them… *hint* *hint*

If you’d like to have a say in choosing what particular ‘Famous Figure’ material you’d like me to review in February, please make sure you keep up-to-date with my Instagram profile (credentials will be posted down below) and vote in the polls that I will be posting on my story later this month!

The winning material will be revealed on 31st January both on the blog as well as on the ‘gram so keep your eyes peeled!

Are you excited for February’s theme? If not; tell me why and make a recommendation yourself under the ‘Contact’ section!

Until February,

Daisy

ThatBookBlog

WordPress: @daisythebookblogger

Instagram: @thatbookblogger